A white supremacist accused of killing James Byrd Jr. in the year 1998 by dragging the man behind a truck, which was one of the most notorious hate crimes of modern times was prosecuted in Texas. The victim was then 49-year-old.

The 44-year-old John William “Bill” King was put to death by lethal injection and declared at 7:08 pm in Huntsville at the US Death Chamber, informed the Texas Department of Criminal Justice in a statement.

The department informed that King wrote the last statement, which reads, “Capital Punishment: Them without the capital get the punishment.”

The convict along with Lawrence Brewer and Shawn Berry was alleged of kidnapping Byrd while he was hitchhiked in Jasper on June 7, 1998 in Texas.

Prosecutors claim that the men have dragged him behind their 1982 Ford pickup truck for 5 km (3 miles) before dumps his body in front of African-American Church. A “KKK” engraved lighter was among the proof police found at the incident spot, disclosed the court documents.

The horrifying murder induced the passing of James Byrd Jr. Hate Crimes Act, reinforcing punishments for hate crimes in Texas. The killing, along with that of Mathhew Shepard, who is a student of the University of Wyoming, was also beaten to death. He was also the genesis of the Federal Hate Crimes Prevention Act, which was passed in the year 2009.

In 1999, King was found guilty of capital murder and was sentence to death. He was an important member of a white supermacist outfit and aimed to start a race war while in jail for a previous crime. King further discuss to initiate new members by having then kidnapped and killing of black people, showed the court documents.

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