A safety panel established by the US President Donald Trump in the vigil of numerous school shootings suggested that schools assess arming staff, keeping veterans as guards and moving back on the track of Obama-era guidelines.

The Federal Commission on School Safety panel, led by Education Secretary Betsy Devos, was set up after the butchery in February in Parkland of Florida while a former student shot dead 17 people inflaming mass gun control protests.

The commission rejected the urge to increase the minimum required age for gun purchasing, arguing in its 180-page documentation that most school shooters acquire their weapons from family members or friends.

Instead, it recommended arming staff – even teachers in some circumstances —” for the sake of efficiency and immediately responding to violence ”.

In the school districts where the response of police could be slower, such as rural districts, may profit specifically according to the commission.

It also suggested education authorities hiring by military veterans and former police officers who “can also serve as highly effective educators”.

The report influences for a review of disciplinary guidelines initiated in 2014 under former President Barack Obama, which recommend alternatives to dismiss and exclusion to handle intolerance against black and Latino students.

The report from commissions informed the measure has had “ a strong negative impact on school discipline and safety”.

The American Civil Liberties Union criticized that proposition. It claimed in a statement, “The Trump administration is exploiting tragedies to justify rolling back school children’s civil rights protections, despite the lack of any evidence linking school discipline reform to school shootings ”

Related Articles
Next Story
Going Viral
United States Reaches Trade Agreements With Tokyo, Says President Trump

United States Reaches Trade Agreements With Tokyo, Says President Trump

by Chandrani Sarkar September 17, 2019
On Monday, the United States President Donald Trump has said that Washington had struck trade deals with Tokyo, which could be executed without congressional approval, but ceased short of assuring Japan that new tariffs wouldn’t impose on vital auto exports.  In a letter to the US Congress released by the White House, President Trump has said that he intended to enter into the deals on digital trade and tariff barriers...