WASHINGTON – On Thursday, June 21, 2018- the member of the House Republican leadership said, “Republicans in the U.S. House of Representatives have not yet rounded up the votes needed to pass immigration legislation they plan to take up later.”

Representative head of the House Republican Conference, Cathy McMorris Rodgers, replied Fox News Channel, “Well, we’re working with our members. Obviously, we have to get 218 votes and we’re working hard to get there”. She also added, “We’re not there yet but we’re working on it”.

The more conservative bill would deny the chance of future citizenship to “Dreamers” – immigrants brought illegally into the United States years ago when they were children.

Even if a bill clears the House, it would face an uncertain future in the Senate, where lawmakers are considering different measures and where Republicans would need at least nine senators from the Democratic caucus to join them to ensure any bill could overcome procedural hurdles.

On Wednesday, President Donald Trump stepped back from his administration’s practice of separating immigrant families that illegally cross the border, which had been part of his so-called zero-tolerance policy on illegal immigration. He signed an executive order to stop the separations but it was unclear how children already taken from their parents would be reunited.

On Thursday, June 21, 2018, Trump posted on tweeter, he renewed his call for a change in Senate rules to allow legislation to move with a simple majority. “What is the purpose of the House doing good immigration bills when you need 9 votes by Democrats in the Senate, and the Dems are only looking to Obstruct,”

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